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Time, Cost, and Scope Constraints
Pre-2014

When outsourcing a large project, Murphy's Law can quickly become your personal credo if you're not careful. Things like a lack of sufficient time, money, and/or concrete requirements are just a few of the things that can and will work against you before you even get started. Here's how to successfully complete an outsourced project even when time, money, and scope are seemingly not on your side.

Limited Time

Working with a limited schedule isn't easy, but when it's all you've got, you have no other choice. Make your deadline an absolute priority and use it to determine how the rest of your project will develop. Prepare back up plans in case 'X' isn't completed by the time 'Y' is finished. If you may not have access to a particular tool prior to the last milestone, for example, have a list of alternative tools ready to use in its place.

Limited Cost

Like with time, make cost a priority since it will determine how the rest of your project will financially develop (unless you manage to win the lottery). In outsourcing, time is money, but money can never be time. More money can buy more time, however when reversed, a lack of money is a dead end. So admit the inevitable and upgrade your options only when additional funds are made available.

Limited Scope

The problem here is working with a scope that's so limited, it's ambiguous enough to invite scope creep or constant changes. Avoid creeps and changes (or creepy changes) by developing a well-defined scope, and don't outsource it until it's agreed upon by all that powers that be. Both scope creep and changes will increase time and costs, making it extremely important to constantly monitor project's progress, and refrain from adding things or changing things without having the means to increase the two factors above.